What is Multi-Hop VPN?

Multi-hop VPN, also called double VPN, is a security feature that uses two or more VPN servers instead of just one to connect to the web. This routing of internet traffic to “hop” between two or more VPN servers before arriving at its destination provides an extra layer of anonymity and protection.

What is Multip-Hop VPN?

Multi-hop VPN, also called double VPN, is a security feature that uses two or more VPN servers instead of just one to connect to the web. This routing of internet traffic to “hop” between two or more VPN servers before arriving at its destination provides an extra layer of anonymity and protection

A Multi-hop VPN, also called Double VPN or VPN Cascading, is when you use more than one server to get from point A to point B. It's an extra layer of security that helps protect your data and identity. If you are traveling, for example, using a multi-hop VPN can connect you with another country without any additional work on your part.

This can be useful in situations where there are firewalls blocking VPN traffic, or if the user has limited bandwidth and needs to work around it.

This blog post will go over the benefits of this type of service and how it can help keep your information protected while surfing online!

How does Multi-hop VPNs work?

multi hop vpn

The Hub encrypts traffic with one of its pre-shared keys and sends it to the last known spoke's external IP address over UDP 500. The spoke that received the traffic decrypts it with its private key and sends it to its destination. It is routed through two VPN servers for effective internet connection and VPN services.

If encryption is not used, spoke uses Reverse Route Injection(RRI) to inject routes toward the hub so packets are internally routed toward the Hub. The spoke recognizes these routes as local since they match the on-link subnet mask. Since packets with a source address of spoke are locally routed, they are dropped by the default route in the NAT device.

When RRI is enabled, the hub injects a default route with the next-hop being itself. This causes packets to be sent to Hub for processing even when the source address matches the on-link subnet at the spoke. To avoid this issue, spoke must have a unique local address on each interface.

The hub can be located at any location, but it is recommended that the spoke should be placed just behind the NAT device so that RRI works fine. This way, internal traffic will not have to cross through the internet again and users won't be able to access it directly from the internet. The first VPN server has your IP address but the one at your destination does not. The last VPN server has your destination but not your original IP address, only that of the previous server. S

How to configure multi-hop VPN?

You need to have at least 3 routers to configure multi-hop VPN. Here are the steps that will help you in configuring it −

1) Configure your hub router with a static IP address and subnet mask. Also, enable RIP routing protocol on it. If you don't know how to do it, please see this link.

2) Configure your spoke router with a unique local address on each interface. You can configure such addresses using the instructions given in the link provided above. After that enable RIP routing protocol on it and add it to the existing network so they can exchange routing information between each other.

3) Associate encryption keys on the Hub and Spoke for VPN connection

5) Enable RRI on the spoke router so packets are internally routed toward Hub even when the source address matches the on-link subnet at the spoke.

4) Configure multi-hop VPN tunnel on both hub and spoke.

Benefits of using Multi-hop VPN

Multi-hop VPN refers to the way one part of the traffic routes through different encrypted links. With multi-hop VPN more than 2 hops are required to send the data packets over the Internet. It is an effective solution of bypassing all geo-restrictions and censorship while preserving anonymity.

VPN service with Multi-Hop allows your device to connect with a particular number of VPN servers using alternate routes. Your traffic will pass through various servers before arriving at the final destination, which will make it impossible to track you.

Multi-hop VPNs feature is actually an ability to create a more complicated network topology with selected nodes (VPN servers) in-between first and last one. You can use dedicated software or VPN client, or VPN chain app for this with multiple servers and double HOp VPN.

Multi-Hop VPN providers are the only solution on the market that allows creating a fully encrypted Initial data channel, where the first node of the chain is connected with the last one and all other nodes in-between. It creates an effect like the Tor network – your data goes through various points before arriving at the final destination. Instead of a single VPN server, the internet traffic is routed through double VPN servers. With tor-browser, the single-hop VPN includes a multi-hop connection for the second VPN server in a virtual machine.

Summary

What is a multi-hop VPN? A multi-hop VPN provider is an encrypted network tunnel that has multiple hops between the client and the server. These multi-hop connections can be direct or indirect, meaning they can either go through one or more intermediary servers to get from point A to point B.

The purpose of using a multi-hop VPN service like NordVPN vs ExpressVPN is for added security by obscuring your true location on the internet. The more “hops” your data goes through before it reaches its destination, the more secure it will be. This is because each time your data passes through a new network node, there's less chance that someone could intercept communications between you and the final destination.

All premium VPN services like ExpressVPN and NordVPN provide the multi-hop feature.

References

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/multi-hop-encrypt-your-data-twice-enhanced-security

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